Saturday, 26 April 2014

Sewing vs Ready-Made

There are two messages or morals here in this little personal story for the day.........

Many make their own clothes because they simply like to be creative and individual, whilst others sew because nothing off the peg fits - others find it more economical.

On Tuesday, my eldest Granddaughter, Kirsten, asked if a parcel from Melbourne sent Express would reach her within 2 days, guaranteed. I reported from past experience, because she lived out on the South Coast NSW, a very definite NO. "Looks like I'll have to make an outfit myself then", was the response.
Friend's dress-up party to which she wanted to go as a Native American (Indian) was Saturday night and everyone was asked to go as someone with a name commencing with N  A   or T since Nat was her friend's name.

Off to the local shops to buy some "stuff" and out came my daughter's trusty old Bernina 730, not the new model 730, the OLD vintage one. My father gave it to me when I was 19 or 20 and I passed it on to Melinda. I think it was 1964.
Kirsten is 20 and I've now dubbed her Miss 730. When I sent a text reminding her that I was her age when Poppy gave me my first sewing machine and now she is using it, her response is not printable! You wouldn't remember a past Newsletter in which I showed the Year 12 formal dress she made on this same machine a couple of years ago. Melinda sent me these photos thinking I would be proud to see the 730 being used so much. I have their permission to share here.


Two of her friends purchased their outfits online and when received, they didn't fit. So, out came the 730 again and off she whipped around to their house, did the alterations and off they've gone to the party.
After a search on Internet, they found some Indian names.
Inteus (has no shame), alias Bianca, on the left, 
Dichal (speaks a lot), alias Kirsten, on the right.
I wonder if Mr. Bernina would like to hear this story?
He was at the AQC last week in Melbourne, blogs of which will continue here in the next few days.

What do you think are the two morals?

Post below what you think they are 
and I will send a 
Gift Pack of Thread to the selected winner.

I hope Inteus and Dichal are enjoying the party as I type!

21 comments:

  1. One has to be something about the value of buying quality. That 50-yr-old machine was built to last. And the other is that having the skills to "do it yourself" means that you never get stuck without a costume (or with an ill-fitting one)!

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    1. Both true Vireya and you would know :) I loved that old machine, it sewed many a garment for both pleasure and to earn a few dollars when I was first married. Lovely to hear from you.

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  2. First one is "if you want something done right do it yourself" The second one is "An oldie but a goodie" :)

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    1. Well, that's true too Karen. Thank you

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  3. I think the moral is that you should always have your own sewing machine and know how to use it. Then you don't have to rely on someone else. Great costumes she did by the way.

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    1. Quite true. Yes, Kirsten made hers simply by copying a photo of one she saw on the internet. What was amazing was that Bianca had never seen anyone use a sewing machine!

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  4. Moral 1 : Old Berninas never die. Quality soldiers on for ever.
    Moral 2 : A determined sewer is faster than Australia Post.

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    1. Hi Helen, first one is so very true; second one is a shame that it could be true and it shouldn't be. Thanks, Judy

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  5. Carol in Stirling ACT27 April 2014 at 11:21

    A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. And A friend in need is a friend indeed. She's learnt a lot from her grandma. Well done Kirsten!

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    1. Hi Carol, Two true sayings for sure. Neither of her friends outfits they purchased online fitted, both needing alterations. Just wish my three granddaughters of Melinda's lived closer so as holiday learning could be more often. Regards, Judy

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  6. Moral number 1: Always buy the best machine you can afford and look after it. It will then look after you.
    Moral number 2: Learn to sew/teach the young to sew and share your talents.
    I learned to sew from my mother on a hand crank machine which I still have and my grandmother on a treadle, which I also have. I made my first electric machine sewn garment in 2nd grade on my Mum's machine. From early teens I was making all my own clothes and by mid teens sewing for my friends as well. When I was 20 I made a long bridesmaid's dress with gathered skirt and long, puffy, cuffed sleeves for a workmate's sister to wear to my workmate's wedding (red hailspot on white voile - it was 1971). I can't remember why the emergency but I do remember the gratitude when I delivered the dress an hour before the wedding.
    Sewing has always and will always be a part of who I am. I sewed then for pleasure, economy and creativity; now my patchwork passion is hardly economical!
    Bless you Mum and Nanna. Mum died when I was 15 and Nanna a year or 2 later. Time to start teaching my grandchildren!

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    1. Jenny, both are so true. Start teaching those grandchildren now. I had Sharelle's two boys sewing from 7, they didn't think twice about it, being boys. Judy

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  7. Moral 1, an old sewing machine will look after you if you look after the machine. Moral 2, always learn what you can when young eg. Sewing knitting etc, in later life most of us will go out to work, but I retirement years the skills earned in younger years will keep idle hands busy. Moral 3 , do what you can yourself, you know whatever done is as you like it, not what others want moral 4, the old saying waste of want not.

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    1. Hi Effie,
      Hey, there's so much wisdom coming in these replies. Yours are all true. Think I may have to draw one out of the hat :) Judy

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  8. Well done Kirsten. Bet she was wrapped she could make her own outfit much faster than Aussie Post could deliver and how "cool" to complete alterations on her friends online purchases.
    As for morals. They certainly don't make things like they use to - I have a few sewing machines - none of them new or fancy all of them pre loved by a family member. If I keep them well oiled and serviced they never let me down. I am not sure I would be able to say the same for the cheaper ones you can buy today - although time may see me eat my words.
    So glad you have been able to pass your skills onto your grand children - I see more often than I would like nonna doing the mending because Mum has no idea. I have taught all my children to at least sew on a button and complete basic mending tasks. Yes even my son. I sewed the first button back after some school yard fun but have made him do everyone since. Some may say I am tough I like to think I am making my children self sufficient - they wont have to rely on an ill fitting on line purchases :)

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  9. Actually, she enjoys it. Self-satisfaction and I'm proud that she just gets in and "does" it. I think her friends were amazed! Thanks for your entry. Judy

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  10. I was interested in 'from my craft rooms' comments. We had one girl and five boys, they were all taught to cook, clean sew etc, and yes most of the boys use sewing machines . Some of the boys do a better job than their spouses. One son is following in his fathers footsteps and sews weather goods on a machine. He has five sewing machines, one an old singer treadle that was my husbands Mums and my husband is 80 this year, the treadle is still used no you are not tough, just a good teacher.

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  11. Should have read leather goods not weather goods in my last post

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  12. I'm not sure that I could condense it into two morals but the main thing for me is buy the best you can afford, whether it is a sewing machine or furniture right down to the food you eat. Quality tells. And yes, absolutely, pass on your skills wherever and whenever you can. I had a lecturer (architecture) who would always answer any technical question with 'look it up in the library'. Well I don't have to tell you that there are some things one just can't find in a book, they are only available as someone else's experience and that someone has a moral obligation to pass the information on to enquiring minds. I taught my daughter to sew, hopefully she will teach her daughters as well. And, btw, I still have my 1973 Elna SU which I bought when said daughter was just a few months old. These days I tend to use my more modern Berninas but the old girl is still there waiting for a new home - hopefully with one of the granddaughters.

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  13. You are SO right and I certainly do hope your Elna finds a good home within your family. Skilled tradesmen are becoming scarce too. Thanks for your entry. Judy

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  14. Firstly this brought tear to my eye, when I saw this sewing machine I was a little overwhelmed, this is the same model Bernina my mother gave me when I first fell pregnant over 30 years ago, my doesn't time fly? My mother has since passed away and unfortunately things happen not within our control and alas I lost my sewing machine my mum gave me. But on a great note, wow you and your daughter have done a wonderful job bringing up such a independent and very talented young lady. I don't think that there are too many young girls her age that have the skills or the desire to make, alter or design anything, let alone a cute little outfit like this and then to go and fix her friends as well, well done to you all. This is definitely a backhanded advantage of living outside the city, where the youngsters just go out and buy and throw away and buy again. Good luck to her , this little one is certainly on her way! Fashion designer maybe?

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